Design

Creating Your Ideal Design

If you wish Lyndale to design a staircase for you, then you can just forward your architect’s plans or any basic measurements that you have and that will allow us to design the staircase for you or alternatively follow the detail below which describes how to go about the design of a staircase. Below is the information that you need to take the basic measurements of a staircase.

The Floor To Floor measurement is typically the first measurement required when designing a staircase. This determines the rise of each tread, and in turn provides the minimum tread going. The Floor to Floor measurement is taken from your finished floor where the bottom of the staircase where it rests on the floor, to the finished landing floor where the staircase will hook on to the trimmer, including the floor boarding.

The next step is to determine the minimum amount of treads that will be required for the staircase. You need to achieve a Tread Rise of no more than 220mm to comply with current building regulations for residential properties.

Examples

Example A

Should the Floor To Floor measurement be 2600mm divided by 13 treads each tread rise will be 200mm which is within the 220mm maximum permitted for a residential staircase. The minimum tread going for a rise of 200mm would be 223mm to keep the stairs at a maximum pitch of 42 degrees to comply with current building regulations for residential properties. You can of course increase the tread going to reduce the angle or just make the stairs longer should you need to

Example B

Should the Floor To Floor measurement be 2860mm divided by 13 treads each tread rise will be 220mm which is on the limit of the 220mm maximum permitted for a residential staircase. The minimum tread going for a rise of 220mm would be 244mm to keep the stairs at a maximum pitch of 42 degrees to comply with current building regulations for residential properties. You can of course increase the tread going to reduce the angle or just make the stairs longer should you need to

If your Tread Going falls below 220mm, then your minimum Tread going will be no less than 220mm. Different classes of staircases have different maximum Tread Rises.

The Width of the staircase is the next measurement required. Typically there is no minimum staircase Width that has to be met in the UK Building Regulations, but obviously it has to be wide enough for an average person to walk up comfortably. Once you start adding a turn to your staircase then you will find that you might have to increase the width of your stair. We would recommend a Width no smaller than 650mm, with an average staircase coming in at about 840mm, and large staircases reaching 1200mm and beyond.

We have covered the 4 key measurements when creating stair designs below – for a full list of terms see the terminology page:

Term Definition
Floor To Floor Distance between the floors where the staircase sits and where the staircase finishes
Tread Rise Distance between the top of one tread to the top of the next tread measuring vertically
Tread Going The distance from the front of one riser to the front of the next riser measuring horizontally.
Width Width of the staircase

Landings and Winding Treads

Landings are a simple way of making a staircase turn through 90 and 180 degrees. There are 2 main types of landing, the Quarter Space Landing and the Half Space Landing. The Quarter Space Landing is typically square, and enables you to turn through 90 degrees. The Half Space Landing is more than twice the size of the Quarter Space Landing and turns through 180 degrees. Both types of landing are normally the same width of your staircase.

Winding treads are another way of turning a staircase through 90 degrees and 180 degrees using three or four treads at various angles. Winding treads are more difficult to work out due to the inclusion of Box measurements and a number of UK Building regulations that have to be met. This is something that you don’t really need to worry about too much since we will do all of the calculations for you.

For further information on the UK Building Regulations, please see document K1 of the Building Regulations 2000 document.

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